Search
Medical Benefits Autism

Autism

Autism

Unlike cancer or HIV, Autism isn't a specific disease, but a spectrum of mental health disorders that, depending on who you ask, may include conditions as common as ADHD or as difficult to identify as Asperger's Syndrome. To date, much of the information about the use of medical marijuana to treat autism spectrum disorders is anecdotal. Parents of afflicted children say that using cannabis helps the symptoms - calming anxiety, easing tensed muscles, etc.

Earlier this year, however, the American biotech company Cannabis Science, Inc., which develops pharmaceutical cannabis products announced a partnership with an organization called UF4A - the Unconventional Foundation for Autism. The goal is for Cannabis Science to help the Foundation build on its success with the proprietary cannabinoid treatment formulae it's already using.

According to representatives of UF4A, eleven autistic children, so far, have had positive results from pharmaceutical cannabis treatments, but there is concern that such children may become addicted to marijuana as they grow older, or abuse it later in life. As such treatment is also very new it's too soon to determine any long-term effects, positive or negative.

In a press release announcing the partnership with Cannabis Science, Mieko Hester Perez, the founder and executive director of UF4A said, "We believe that this new partnership with Cannabis Science will give us additional push and resources required to advance our Autism research. To date, we have already partnered with the University of California Irvine Medical Center to oversee our cannabis-based Autism research. Included in this group of advisors is the Dean of Medicine at UCI, and child psychiatrist Dr. Rebecca Hedrick M.D. Dr. Melamede of Cannabis Science will be an outstanding addition to the Board of the Foundation. His extensive knowledge of cannabinoid science should prove invaluable in our mission."

The bottom line here is that the effects of medical marijuana on autism spectrum disorders are being studied, and some children with such conditions have shown improvement. Time will tell whether or not those improvements continue.

Comments
 
Avatar
Guest | Nov 28, 2013
 
  Quote: Would the cannabis oil work as well? the oil would not be habit forming.. Yes oil would work as well, if not better. But you are mistaken as any way of ingesting marijuana can be habit forming. The important thing to realize, is that it is NEVER chemically addictive. Only psychologically addictive, so it's completely in the mind of the user whether they have a problem stopping use, or not. Any form of ingesting cannabis can potentially be 'habit forming' but no more than eating candy and liking it can be 'habit forming.'
Avatar
Guest | Nov 20, 2013
 
Would the cannabis oil work as well? the oil would not be habit forming..
Avatar
Guest | Sep 29, 2013
 
I have been doing research trying to get my son eligible to try this. He has high functioning autism and a lot of what we see is behavioral. Very aggressive. He has expressed to me the feeling of being "trapped" in his own body. We tried various medications, but it just doesn't make sense to ruin his body to treat x and y. However, marijuana appears to have much less side effects and the same results. I am terrified of bringing this up with his doctors and care providers, though. Why is it so much easier to prescribe something much more dangerous, yet "legal"... but MJ is so terrifying? There is a reason so many states are opening up to it!
Avatar
Guest | Sep 29, 2013
 
I am a parent of a child that is autistic . bi polar , adhd , odd , ptsd , and seures I have been told by so many that to give him 420 for almost all the disorders he has but he has blood work done every few weeks and I live in a state that's not a medical state so I don't know what to do
Avatar
Guest | Sep 22, 2012
 
... Thank you to the person who said "Wake Up World". Also, I have compassion for those sufferers of psychiatric disorders and it's unfortunate that the Cannabis treatment didn't work for the patient just above this comment. Maybe it would be a matter of finding the right strain. There is a huge spectrum of all the different strains which are good for specific ailments. I am glad now that we are conducting studies. I myself take psych meds (somewhat aimed at bipolar, ADHD, and Asburger's Syndrome) and the meds have had such horrible side effects. MMJ not only has taken care of those distressing side effects,... It's improving my health all the way around. I take this seriously and like to weigh the evidence. I'm just learning... Hope my comment might help someone in saomeway.
Avatar
Guest | Jan 29, 2012
 
Thanks for this, check out cannabisforautism.wordpress.com for all the info in one place!
Avatar
Guest | Jan 18, 2012
 
why is it that CA is the only state willing to have enough sense to try this out for autistic children. Why can't other states have the intelligence and thrive that CA has. two thumbs up for you! Wake up world !
Avatar
Guest | Nov 18, 2011
 
I am Aspergers myself and have tried marijuana. unfortunately it had undesirable effects on me, causing me to hallucinate, become paranoid and lose interest in music, my main love. of course I was a "once every few months" smoker, so....and heavily medicated.
Avatar
Guest | Nov 9, 2011
 
The thing that I can't understand is why parents and caregivers are so worried about patients becoming addicted to marijuana, yet they are not worried about their children becoming addicted to prescription medications. Most of these prescribed medications have side effects that are way worse than the condition being treated. If I had children, I would much rather them be on a medical marijuana program than doped up with pills that harm their bodies more than they help. It seems like such a simple decision to me. Would you rather take something organic that you can grow yourself or a pill that is mass manufactured and you have no real idea what the complete chemical compound is of it?
Avatar
Guest | Sep 21, 2011
 
I wish I could get in touch with the person who wrote above about their 19 year old son, because my 21 year old daughter is severely autistic and they have her on HALDOL which is horrible, and I was worried about trying MMJ while she is on that medication. You said that your son is on Risperdal, and I know that med is in the same family as the Haldol (only newer). I would love to speak with you further. How do I get in touch with you??
Avatar
Guest | Sep 21, 2011
 
To the person above. I would love to get in touch with you because my 21 year old autistic daughter is on Haldol, which is in a similar family as Risperdal, which your son is on, and I am afraid to try MMJ while she is on it, but afraid of taking her off it because of potential aggression. I would love to get in touch with you further. How can I do that?
Avatar
Guest | Sep 21, 2011
 
As you can see, I wrote twice because I cannot seem to get the hang of those CAPTCHA codes or whatever they are.
Avatar
Guest | Sep 21, 2011
 
Sorry I entered that twice. Can't get the hang of the Captcha code thing.
Avatar
Guest | Sep 18, 2011
 
I have been using marijuana for a year and a half for my 19 year old son with severe autism and have had great results. He has improved in every area of development (speech & cognition, social, and behavior). He was very aggressive (biting, pinching, and hitting others) and his aggression has become almost non-existent due to the marijuana. I have greatly reduced the pharmaceutical medication that he takes (Risperdal and Lexapro) and I will probably discontinue it altogether soon. I would recommend this to all parents of autistic children. The results can be seen almost immediately (10 minutes) after he ingests a small piece of a marijuana cookie or brownie. The affect it has on his life has been miraculous. It has just allowed his body to relax, and therefore he can learn and cooperate with others. He is so much happier and more in tune with the world and what is going on. It has been truely life-changing. If I could turn back the clock, I would give him marijuana much earlier in his life. I believe, no -- I KNOW -- he would be much higher functioning today if he had received this medication when he was a small child. Please don't be afraid of trying it. The great thing about this is that you can immediately see the results. If you don't like the results, just don't give it to your child again. I am confident that it will positively impact many children and adults with autism.
Avatar
Guest | Aug 13, 2011
 
My son has Autism and I am going to make one thing loud and clear if the Doc's would just watch the results, on any diorder includig my own how can they (City, gov, feds, docs) get in the way!
Avatar
Guest | Aug 13, 2011
 
My so has Autism and I have a disorder as well and really has anyone ever tried to tell there Doc how much your Green works have you seen that look?
Avatar
Guest | Jun 3, 2011
 
MMJ is no doubt a very underused drug for autism. It would be especially helpful for those autistics suffering from chronic health damaging behaviors like self injurious behaviors where they harm themselves with little relief, according to research, from drugs now available and widely prescribed by doctors. The harsh side effects from drugs like zyprexa, seroquel, haldol and risperadal are well known and have harmed many autistic persons. It's time the medical community advocate for the compassionate and careful use of medical marijuana for autistic persons. No autistic person should have to suffer for years due to repeatedly failed pharamaceutical interventions.
Avatar
Kushie Q | May 1, 2011
 
If you have ever seen or been around a child with autism, you know that anything that could help them is a wonderful thing. The effects on the brain are tremendous and very helpful, far better than all the drugs that the doctors will want to give. How can those chemicals be good for anyone, especially a child.
Avatar
Guest | Apr 7, 2011
 
i agree my cousin has asburgers syndrom and we hot box the room with him in it and he shows extereem signs of less anxiety and even better behavior
Avatar
lindzzz | Apr 5, 2011
 
It is the same with any medicine that an individual may become mentally or physically dependent upon a medicine that they take long-term, such as from childhood. It has been proven that marijuana is not physically addictive, yet people get withdrawals from it after they are daily smokers for years and they quit cold turkey. I believe that if cannabis helps children with autism, they should be able to use it. It has to be less addictive than anti-anxiety pills.
Avatar
| Apr 1, 2011
 
My neightbors son had it and they used to have him sit in the room and hot box it. They did this until he tryed mmj himself.